To Greenland with Love

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I love all the people in Greenland. I don’t particularly have a reason for this – it just appeared in my mind and heart and it asked me to tell you about it.

Greenland is a big place with a small population. Those people have a more difficult life than those in many other countries and yet they live and smile and love just the same.

All the cares you have and the ambitions and hopes you cherish are also alive in the hearts of those people in Iceland.

They have loves and hates (probably not Brussels sprouts – but valid all the same). They rush from here to there (maybe not so crazily – but still). They have problems and find solutions. Their toenails need clipping every now and again. In fact – they are pretty much just the same as you and me.

We should extend our love to people living in Greenland – as much love as you give your children and your pet hamster, that much you should give to the people in this land (and more).

For today, say a prayer (or have a kind thought, or send powerful energy, or cultivate good wishes – whatever is your practice) for the folk in Greenland and maybe one day, when you need support and love, you’ll find a parcel of wonderful energy coming right back at you.

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89 thoughts on “To Greenland with Love

    • I admit too that I know virtually nothing about the people in Greenland – it seems to me like some sort of place that the world forgets. Still – all the love and prayers are sure to bring a little sunshine.
      Have a great day, Stephanie (or do you prefer Steph?)
      Kindness – Robert.

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      • I was drawn to visit Greenland because of the country’s relative isolation from the rest of the world, the extremely small population in relation to its size, the Inuit culture, its interesting relationship with Denmark., etc. Did you know that there are only 150 km of roads in the whole country, and that the longest road is only 40 km? In the winter, people travel by plane between cities and use dogsleds or snowmobiles to get from one town/village to another.

        No, I didn’t write a blog post about it, as I tend not to write about personal experiences on my blog (I am blogging anonymously after all :-)). However, now that you’ve mentioned it, maybe it isn’t a bad idea to write about it after all. I’ll think about it. 🙂

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      • Not rude at all. Assertive. 😉 You have every right to take things one question at a time. Life should be according to our own making, not according to the petulant demands of others (that means me). It’s another beautiful day of single digit temperature (C that is, not F). How goes it with you today?

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      • That’s right – life should not be lived according to the petulant demands of others, including yours. ☺I’m glad you gave me the temperature in Celsius; Fahrenheit is not a familiar unit of measurement for me. After a couple of weeks of abnormally warm weather (above freezing in the single digits), we now have our usual freezing temperatures in the double digits. No more gross, slushy puddles. I’m feeling very well today, thanks!

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      • Oh, wait – this is a conversation. This is on my blog. Make it big! 🙂
        The Wire? Erm. Oh, okay – it was because I said ‘true that’. I first heard that phrase on that show. I watch no TV – I bought the boxset in a supermarket about 7 years ago and have only just gotten around to watching it.
        And now – a conversation continuing question (essential if you want to get a reply): do you live in a tent (like on the photo at the top of your blog)?

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      • You answered all my questions even though I didn’t answer all of yours. Does that mean you’re more of a giver than a taker? The expression “true that” is ultra-American, I think. I mentioned before that I watch very little TV; I deliberately choose not to have a TV, but occasionally watch TV shows online.
        That’s not a tent…it’s a teepee! And no, I don’t live in one. Nor do I live in an igloo.
        Why don’t you watch TV?
        For you, what’s the difference between a friend and an acquaintance?

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      • Why would I think you live in an igloo? 🙂 You don’t have a picture of one on your site. Touched a nerve?
        Friends share on a deeper emotional level than acquaintances (and the spelling is much, much easier).
        I gave my TV away decades ago along with the VCR because I just wasn’t watching it and had a friend who was starting a media course and did not have a TV. I used to go around to her house to watch the one show that I still watched, which was called Northern Exposure. The reason I never watched it was that I was always out with friends etc. That, and the adverts were the best things on.
        The friends v acquaintances question – very interesting. What’s the difference between close friend and lovers (for you)? 🙂

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      • I was kidding about the igloo; you certainly didn’t touch a nerve. I was just making fun of the stereotype that those in the northern latitides live in igloos. 😉 In that case, you would also be living in one.
        I haven’t had a TV for years. With an Internet connection, I see no need to pay extra for TV, and most of what’s on TV is crap anyway. I lived in the UK for several years, and kept getting hunted down by the licencing ‘authorities’ because they didn’t believe I had no TV.
        As for close friends vs. lovers, that’s a fascinating question. The first distinction that comes to mind is that the former involves a close emotional connection but not a sexual connection, while the latter encompasses both types of connections. What about you – what do you consider to be the difference between the two?
        Oh, and keeping in mind that comments here are public, perhaps we could communicate via e-mail?

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      • Yeah, no – never lived in an igloo, although we built plenty of snow-forts when I was a kid. 🙂
        Here’s what I read on Wikipedia – although igloos are stereotypically associated with all Inuit, they were traditionally associated with people of Canada’s Central Arctic and Greenland’s Thule area. Fascinating – yes?
        Yeah, I am prey for the TV Licensing people. Such fun!
        I think we should stick to subjects that are suitable for a public forum. I have tried email, but it tends to lead to unhappiness in one form or another.

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      • It didn’t snow enough during the few years I was in the UK to build snow-forts, but that’s probably because I lived in the south. (I still can’t believe that a few centimetres of snow was enough to stop all rail traffic.)
        What you learned about igloos is indeed fascinating. I wonder how often they need to be rebuilt.
        You’ve made a very wise suggestion about sticking to topics that are suitable for a public forum. I agree with that course of action. ☺

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      • I’d like to take a photograph of my fingers to send to you. Or even a video as they dance across the keyboard. These things I can do.
        More difficult is to send you a picture of my mind. So many shadows and sunny places. So much nuance and hardly any one place of black or white.
        To move thoughts from my mind into my fingers. To make them travel far away and across the sea. To think that they can pass through all the filters set in place by my life and then through the ones you have set in place on the channels between the screen and your mind. To imagine that they can still have meaning after their satellite surfing course through the heavens. This is to expect too much.
        Put simply – yes it’s a wise course of action. But the complexities!
        How is it possible that we ever understand anything, my friend? How?!
        And the safe subjects.
        Snow. Snow-forts. Rail travel. Igloos. Geography. Weather.
        Ah!

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      • You should see the smile on my face right now. I am mesmerised. Please don’t disappear again, Robert. I’d rather make small talk with you (and I normally can’t stand small talk) than endure silence. Holy sh*t, aren’t we both melodramatic. 😜

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      • Silence? We are built of silence! It is our very nature. How are we to avoid silence when our very being is thus?
        My small talk consists of such things. I speak not of weather and railway systems but of matters of inner …
        Yeah, yeah, I know – what is all this BS. Of course I talk of trivialities – you only have to look at my blog for the evidence to jump up and bite the skin behind your knee.

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      • Perfect – I prefer to talk about abstract concepts as well. I almost always have my head in the clouds and need to force myself to concentrate on the trivialities of everyday life out of necessity.
        Is that your way of inviting me to explore your blog? 😊
        One of my cats sometimes jumps up and bites me (softly) in the knee.

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      • No, not really. I’m happy with my blog the way it is. If you read it or ignore it, then that is your prerogative. If you read it and find pleasure in doing so, then that is good too. If you don’t read it and find pleasure in talking to me, then that is also good.
        I’m reading The Leftovers by Tom Perrotta at the moment. Maybe you caught the TV series?
        Orange and brown is the duvet cover on my bed – I like rich colours. Pleasantly laid back and slippery is the soundtrack to The Leftovers, which I am listening to as I type these words. In between the words I am typing an assignment that needs must be delivered tomorrow. The carpet is golden, the curtains yellow, the dark sky blocked from my eyes, the chest of drawers is brown and contains mostly paper. I prefer my clothes in sight, so they are stacked on top – neatly as befits my nature. Bears watch me from the chair. Laptop clacks as I hit the keys. Traffic swooshes like the seaside on a stormy night. My back wants to straighten, but I tell it ‘soon, soon’ to soothe it. So many books here. On the shelves – waiting to be read, and in my head – begging to be written.
        Smart cat – to bite so soft.
        Tell me about your pussy-cat.

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      • Somehow, I already knew that you wouldn’t mind one way or another whether I read your blog or not.
        I just looked up The Leftovers online; no, I’d never heard of the TV series. Very interesting premise. Are you enjoying the book?
        Currently, I’m reading the Earth’s Children series by Jean Auel. I finished the third book this past weekend, and the end brought me to tears.
        I’m at work, having just finished a kiwi and an orange, as well as a few pieces of whole wheat toast with peanut butter. Aside from the hum of computers and printers, there are not many other sounds except for footsteps on stairs, the shuffling of papers, and the light tapping of my fingertips on my phone as I’m typing this. (It’s awkward typing such a long comment with my phone’s touchscreen keyboard). It’s snowing lightly, but I can’t see the outside from my desk.
        My cat is a full-grown, 6-lb Calico beauty, and she’s the love of my life. She’s from Indonesia. Do you have pets?

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      • No pets. None at all. I had a spider once, but he went away. They are more independent even than cats.
        Tell me how close you came to biting at my last question.
        Kiki make me feel ill. I once bought a bag of 12 and eating them all put me right off.
        I read the Earth Children series apart from the last one, which is on a shelf above my head – waiting for me. They are good.
        The Leftovers is a very will written book. Interesting and intriguing.
        Office, huh. Snow, huh. Phone, huh. Love, huh. Sounds like you have a life. 🙂
        Where do you want to go with your life next?

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      • Your spider probably went to find female spiders (hopefully, none of them ended up eating him…I’ve heard about female spiders eating their mates).
        How would I go about “biting” a question? I was a bit surprised by it, as I thought you were going to keep things at a PG13 rating (oops, I mean 12A in UK terms).
        A colleague lent me the whole Earth’s Children series. Are you planning to read the last book?
        I will definitely check out the book The Leftovers, and listen to the soundtrack of the TV series. Thanks.
        That’s a huge question. I don’t think much about the future (past the next few weeks or months), but my goal is to live in a different place (town, city, or country) every few years. So far, I’ve lived in Canada (of course), Indonesia, Hong Kong, Austria, and England (not in that order). And you, my friend?

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      • Ah, yes – the urge to mate. Understood.
        No, you couldn’t actually ‘bite’ a question. It’s more a euphemism than a physical act. But yes – sorry – keep it clean. We call it PG13 here as far as I’m aware.
        Travel, huh. Commendable. I did a whole set of travelling already (none of the places you mention apart from Canada – one of three places (apart from here) that I could live – Canada, Hawaii and Italy). I want to concentrate on my creativity for a while – see if I can make it pay. I have a 2 year plan, which is on my blog somewhere. Typically, it’s not called that – I tend to have obscure titles for posts. Good luck if you look for it. 🙂

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      • Do you find it difficult to keep it clean? Serious question (not THAT serious though).
        I’ve visited Italy several times, but wouldn’t want to live there due to the rampant bureaucracy there. I speak a little Italian (self-taught, as I Canada already speak French and Spanish). Where did you visit in Canada?
        Having a 2-year plan is very sensible. I tell myself sometimes that I should be more sensible.

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      • I’m a guy – what do you expect. That’s about as serious as the matter gets. I’m watching Ally McBeal at the moment and one of the scenes references the ‘dumb stick’ as being that which makes a man stupid in certain situations. I’ll let you figure out what that’s all about. And no, I can’t draw a diagram! 🙂
        Sometimes you sound young and sometimes you sound old(er). The phrase ‘rampant bureaucracy’ is something that leads me to plonking you in the latter category.
        Two year plans are not my style at all. I just call it a wish list, and then set out to make it happen.
        What else is on your wish list (or bucket list if you prefer a phrase that matches rampant bureaucracy)?

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      • Oh, come on. Are you saying I that all guys are that way? Not a rhetorical question. I’m sure that sex drive varies from one guy to another. Alright, time to go back to a PG-13 rating.
        My use of the phrase “rampant bureaucracy” makes you think I might be older? Interesting.
        My wish list consists mostly of places I still want to visit: Patagonia, New Zealand, Tanzania, etc. I would also like to run a couple of 10 km races and half-marathons.

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      • PG13 it is … I really have nothing to say in the matter. There – how was that? :b
        Language is indicative of all sorts of things. Perhaps age is one of those?
        That’s an odd set of countries. Makes me interested enough to ask – why those places?
        The running I totally understand – I’ve always liked to run. There’s something about the sense of freedom I get from stretching out my legs and pushing, pushing. Nice. Are you competitive?

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      • Ha ha…good one. Can’t fault you for that.
        I feel drawn to places with vast wilderness – simple enough explanation? ☺
        Yay, a fellow runner! No, I’m not competitive. You?
        Also on my wish list is to pick up (more) Russian and learn Arabic.

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      • I like simple explanations for things. Unless I don’t understand them. Or unless they don’t provide enough information. Or perhaps unless they are pedantic. But apart from that – yes.
        I am rather competitive, yes. I try to be more cooperative, but it does not come naturally.
        What you going to do with your linguistic abilities. Oh, wait – travel? 🙂

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      • Being cooperative comes more naturally to me than being competitive. I suppose it’s true that in general, men are wired to be competitive, while women are programmed to be cooperative?
        I find learning languages a lot of fun. I thrive on the challenge. 😁

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      • I know what you meant. And I think that you know that I know what you meant. And by saying this I surely know that you know that I know what you meant.
        Padded underwear – the very idea! I tell you what would be a good idea, though – penipads. It would save so much effort after peeing. All that shaking and squeezing – and it never works – there’s always a damp patch – as any guy. Maybe you should do a blog post about it. Do a straw poll: who has and who does not have a damp patch.
        Applies to women too – I’m certain of it. Maybe I should do a blog post. 😀

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