Paracombodulation

“Take time to modulate the frequency of the passive resistor residing in the left hand quadrant as mentioned in the aforementioned video. Take careful note that the participle denominator discussed in …”

“What the? … pause, pause!” Johnny stabbed the screen, a blunt forefinger. Over and again. “Pause, you moth… ah, okay.”

The video stopped, went again, jittered a little, then froze – Molly with her mouth open.

“Okay. Participle. What the heck’s a …” New tab, typing pee, ay, argh, tee, igh, pee, ell, ee. Reading, found nothing.

‘Did you mean participle’ said the screen. Sarcastic. “Yes, yes, participle!” More stabbing -feeling fit to commit a murder.

Finally: ‘a word formed from a verb (e.g. going, gone, being, been ) and used as an adjective (e.g. working woman, burnt toast ) or a noun (e.g. good breeding ). In English participles are also used to make compound verb forms (e.g. is going, has been ).’

Eyes scanned back, forth, uselessly trying for meaning. Nothing doing. “Gah!!” Disgust. “Whatever. Play.” Stab, stab …

“… other places at a later date. Beneficial to some would also be the next sequential paracombodulation of the …”

“Paracombu what? No way, totally bogus, made up and not fair!” Tears in his eyes. “Fail, fail. Should have started earli …” Teeth chattering, heart jumping, pulse racing, eyes bulging.

A face slid smoothly from a doorway closely followed by a head, neck and finally a torso – all limbs attached and with perfect balance. A beautifully modulated voice sang forth with a mischievous lilt “Okay, come inside, ladies and gentlemen. You know the drill – bags at the front, bums on seats and don’t turn over the exam paper until you are told to begin.”

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11 thoughts on “Paracombodulation

  1. I thought the word was pericombobulation, read the comments though.
    Really good writing. Exactly how I feel before an exam. You have perfectly captured all the emotions.
    Looking forward to following you. I’ll learn a lot.

    Like

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